Explorations in History and Society

Exploring and Collecting the History of the Somali clan of Hawiye.

Ciise Mudulood: Tradition and possible explanation for lack of cohesion and leadership.

with 10 comments

Gabay

 

Ma duhr dabadiisa

Ma ceel daboole’ aa

Ma dibi daba go’on baa

Ma talo Daba yar baa

Udeejeenoow tusbax afgiisa la gooyey

Ayaan idin ka dhigay

 

 

 

Background

 

A long time ago, the elders of Ciise Mudulood had an important shir in the region of Hiiraan-Galgaduud. This shir was about the election of the Ugaas of the clan. It was around the time of duhr, at a place with a well. During the shir there developed an intense discussion between Gacanweyne subclan and Ifya Yusuf subclan of Udeejeen. Faqi Ebaker (Abaker?) who was from Gacanweyne subclan made a claim to the Ugaas title, but he received stiff opposition from the Ifya Yusuf subclan. After intense discussion with no compromise between the main opposing subclans, the issue was put forward to the youngest section of the clan. This was according to the custom of Udeejeen, in which the younger son could make the decision for the clan after heavy disagreement between the elder sons. This youngest son was Dabayar Maxamed Gaab (which eventually grew into Dabayar subsection of Maxamed Gaab subclan). The decision made by Dabayar was that Faqi Ebaker should not become the Ugaas of the clan. As expected, Faqi Ebaker got angry and recited the above mentioned gabay.

 

In the gabey, Faqi Ebaker first asks about the surrounding of the shir:

 

Ma duhr dabadiisa? 

 

Is it the nearing of Duhr, (meaning the time of the shir, which was around the end of Duhr. )

 

Ma ceel daboole’ aa?

 

Is it a well  (that can be covered, which is the characteristic of this particular well in this gabay where the shir was held)

 

Ma dibi daba go’on baa?

 

Is it a slaughtered ox? (an ox that was slaughtered for the guests of the shir)

 

Ma talo Dabayar baa?

 

Is it the decision of Dabayar? (the decision made by the youngest son Dabayar)

 

Udeejeenoow tusbax afgiisa la gooyey

Ayaan idin ka dhigay

 

Udejeenoow, I make you like the tusbax which its beginning is cut open.

 

This curse of Faqi Ebaker basically ment that he cursed Udeejeen to lose their cohesiveness and go different directions like a ‘tusbax’ which is broken and were all the pieces go different directions.

 

After reciting the gabay, Faqi Ebakar broke his Tusbax with anger, to illustrate the terrible consequences of his curse, and then Macalin Maxumed (the grandfather of Reer Aw Macalin subclan of Udeejeen) stood up and grapped the remaining parts of the tusbax from the hand of Faqi Ebakar and then said: ‘Leave these remaining parts to me’

 

According to this tradition, Udeejeen had a major shir in which they wanted to elect the traditional leadership of the clan. Since the elders at that shir could not agree who should become the Ugaas, the shir ended in distaster in which Faqi Ebakar (the man who made claim to the title) cursed Udeejeen as a whole and ever since that curse Udejeen has lost cohesion and spread to all directions according to the elders and tradition of the clan. Also, this explains why Udeejeen never had any organized form of traditional leadership to this day.

 

This oral tradition is most of the time used as explanation for the fact that Udeejeen (Ciise Mudulood) has remained insignificant as a clan, while younger clans like Abgaal, Xawaadle have become significant. The curse itself is brought forward as one of the explanations for the current state of the clan.But if we move beyond that kind of superstition and look at the fact that the clan itself could not agree on an organized traditional leadership in the form of Ugaas, while other Somali clans had this kind of organized traditional leadership, we can conclude that the clan lost its cohesiveness and divided into many sub units which all went their own different directions as a consequence of lack of leadership that could keep the group together and lead the group as a whole. Only a few stayed behind in the original land of the clan, namely Hiiraan-Galgaduud, while most went westwards, well into Somali Galbeed and even ventured into Oromo land. There is another group (the Dabayar group) that went eastwards well into the Banadir and can be found now in Qalimoow around Balcad.

Source: Oral recollections of Mudulood elder.

Written by daud jimale

February 8, 2009 at 5:32 pm

Posted in Hiiraab

10 Responses

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  1. this is my pleasure to hear the back graound of u dejeen i’m real appriciate this coz i wou;dl like to learn alot of my qabil i’m so happy to be udejeeen

    Hassan

    October 12, 2010 at 12:04 am

    • Love Mudulood and Udeejeen…..proud to to be who i am

      maxamed

      November 8, 2010 at 3:56 am

      • Indeed, bro.

        daud jimale

        November 23, 2010 at 11:11 pm

    • And we are happy to be Mudulood Hiraab and Somali bro. Let’s work to helping bring peace and security to our regions and country. We hope for the unity and prosperity of the Somali people from Waqooye to Konfur iyo Bari ila Galbeed.

      daud jimale

      November 23, 2010 at 11:29 pm

  2. VIVA MUDULOD VIVA UDEEJEEN VIVA JAWIIL AND XAMAR CADE

    Amaal

    December 17, 2010 at 12:17 am

    • Viva Mudulood indeed, sis.

      daud jimale

      December 31, 2010 at 8:23 am

  3. raaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhh udejene ciise all daay everydaayyy..yaadunnoeee baledweyene/jawiil and xamar all daa waay SNMMM,,,!!!

    aymii

    February 7, 2011 at 2:00 pm

  4. who ever posted it thanks, we really need cohesion, Odeejeen are very scattered people, recent developments in jawiil and etc are a start

    sadia

    May 25, 2011 at 1:53 am

  5. Dhaman waxan uma had celina inta isku xilqatay barnamij kan

    Nadiro

    April 29, 2012 at 3:28 am

  6. People are trying to mislead the good name belongs to Ciise Muddulood or Udeejeen, So I wish the Udeejeners must stand up to defend their name and their beloved people! Proud to be Ise Muddulod.
    Jamal

    Jamaal

    December 10, 2012 at 7:35 pm


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